Crowded Beaches and Party Beaches Make Me Dislike People. Here’s Why…

crowded beaches and party beaches
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Crowded Beaches and Party Beaches : Here’s Why They Make Me Dislike People..

How do you react to crowded beaches and party beaches?

Do you feel drawn to crowded beaches and party beaches?

Do you prefer quite, secluded and untouched beaches?

Check out my video response below:

 The Old Simo YouTube video library here

Someone once asked me “what makes you truly happy? When do you feel most at peace?” The answer is simple: When I’m with the ocean. I have had a love affair with beaches for as long as I can remember.

My parents would take me for summer holidays to Apollo Bay in Western Victoria annually. I can clearly remember being five years old, and anxious to see some sight of the ocean after driving on never ending highways and bush land. The first view of that deep blue ocean made my eyes smile and that feeling has never left me.

My home town (Melbourne) is not good for beaches. I can’t handle urban bay water. There are some decent beaches in Victoria along the Western coast and the Southern coast (Sorrento, Portsea). I have traveled the world staying in many coastal towns (particularly in Europe) looking for that slice of oceanic paradise.

My beach days consist of swimming, napping, reading and exploring. It’s so easy to spend a whole day there. I often insist on staying till sunset. Giving my body over to the water is a sensation. I can’t accurately describe how wonderful it feels.

If I could I would bottle ocean water and sell it. When I’m in the sea all my worries fade away with the tide. It cures everything. The saddest goodbyes are leaving the beach for the day, or even worse leaving the beach at the end of a summer holiday. The romance is over, until next year.

I’ve found slices of Australian oceanic utopia in Byron Bay, Ballina, Bunker Bay, and the Sunshine Coast. Europe has given me paradise in the form of beaches in the South of France, North and Southern Italy, Spain, and the Greek Islands.

Nerja

Coast of Nerja, Spain. 

When staying at a hotel resort I insist on fairly large pools. This allows for comfortable pool space for myself and other patrons.

I remember visiting the Tao day beach club in Las Vegas. I’d never been to a day beach club. I was curious so I booked a cabana for the day. The Cabana was wonderful but the swimming pool was horrendous. A small pool with hundreds of people stewing in it. You could barely see any water. Just flesh. Loud human beings making a fuss over tacky dance music. I felt a cold chill of disgust and wouldn’t set food in that cesspool. I spent most of my pool time in the Venetian hotel’s humongous main pool.

It’s one thing to violate man made elements. It’s another matter when people violate natural history. 

Open ocean is always wonderful. Seemingly never ending shores and plenty of room for everyone. You can be comfortable and not feel crowded at all.

Private beaches owned by resorts are also a favorite of mine. Well spaced out sun beds with plenty of room to move about. Best thing about them is that they are for guest use only and their stretch of beach is generally bountiful. Once again, you can have your own temporary beach kingdom and not feel crowded. Limited people means limited noise and destruction to the environment.

Inlets, enclaves and coves are the most problematic. That’s when things become uncomfortable. For example, I can’t bare the thought of spending the day on Bondi Beach in Sydney. Nor can I tolerate spending the day on a packed beach in Mykonos or Ibiza.

I have enjoyed actual beach clubs that are truly discerning. There’s no tacky music pumping. They only allow a small number of people on their beach, and they space out sun beds well. They keep it super clean and they don’t destroy the natural element of it, nor allow people to do that.

I’m generally not a fan of crowds, particularly when they impinge upon natural history and beauty. This is when i detest human beings the most. All the man made elements that they bring with them that defile the beach. Crowded beaches and party beaches are a rape of the land.

I always avoid main beaches because that’s where most people go. Whether I’m in Australia or Europe, I will always seek out a beautiful, secluded and relatively peaceful alternative.  Why are so many people so set on a main crowded beaches and party beaches? What do they seek from it? To see and be seen? Status? Physical validation? Or is just laziness and lack of awareness of alternatives?

Crowded beaches and party beaches are a plague on islands like Mykonos and Ibiza. They have become the default European islands. On many levels this is great! That crowd is contained and localised. This means that islands like Ithica, Metalini, Capri, Sardinia, and Corsica won’t face the same vulgarization

I remember arriving in Mykonos in 2005 and feeling negatively overwhelmed by how busy it was. We decided to hit some of the beaches including Psarou, Paradise and Super Paradise. I couldn’t handle the crowds, the noise, the sun beds laid out like sardines in a can.

It was even worse when many of these beaches turned into “nightclubs”. The littering, the tacky music, the overcrowding and the posturing and posing gave me a high dosage of disdain for people that I was surrounded by. Honestly, I don’t need more reasons to dislike people as a collective. This is why I’ll never attend those horrid full moon parties in Thailand. I know exactly how it will make me feel.

I was so depressed and agitated that I went for a walk and met some local Mykonos Greeks who understood my pain. They referred me to a specific secluded beach. It is ABSOLUTE PARADISE! No busses go there. It’s a large enclave with stunning azure water. It has only one small beach restaurant. Only Greek locals and informed Europeans know about it. People are perfectly scattered along the beach.

The Mykonos beach will remain nameless but as you can see, my eyes were smiling. Please excuse the bandanna. It was bad fashion choice at the time.

mykonos

 

 

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