Valentine’s Day: Why is Platonic Love Being Celebrated?

Valentine's Day
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Should Valentine’s Day be reserved for romantic love only?

Should it  acknowledge and celebrate other types of love?

Check out my video response below:

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Valentine’s day is celebrated  on February 14th.  It’s a day for people and businesses to celebrate the concept of romantic love.

The history of Valentine’s Day or Feast of Saint Valentine has religious origins among Christian denominations. Anglican, Lutheran and Eastern Orthodox faiths recognise Saint Valentine. Valentine’s day initially became associated with romantic love in the Middle Ages along with the tradition of courtly love. This developed into an 18th English Century tradition of lovers exchanging gifts such as flowers, greetings cards, and confectionery. These notions continued on into our modern world and still have a strong presence today.

Many women will eagerly await the gifts and romantic attention their partners will bestow on them. Men will look forward to the sexual effort their partners will undertake. Sex will be more decadent, lengthy and creative than most other nights.

The hospitality and retail sector often look forward to this day and heavily promote their products and services to facilitate in this expression of love.

I don’t believe in celebrating Valentine’s day. I’m willing to acknowledge that it’s not a mere Hallmark day and it does have historical religious significance. But it’s has become a commercialised day that tells us that we need to acknowledge our lovers via romantic gestures that involve money spending. I don’t need an official day dictating how and when I should express my love to my partner. I acknowledge and celebrate it daily via countless formats.

The shift in how people celebrate Valentine’s Day has both unsettled and disturbed me. It’s also become a platonic love celebration.

In the United States over 190 million Valentine’s Day cards are given out each year. This excludes cards that are given out among children at school.  Some US schools have Valentine’s Day programs. These programs  require children  to give each other cards. A child must give a card to each student in the class. This is not negotiable and is done so no child has their feelings hurt. Children are also encouraged to give their teacher a card or gift.

Valentine’s Day has also prompted the idea of mummy/daughter dates or mummy/son dates. Reader’s Digest magazine offers advice on how mothers should celebrate Valentine’s Day with their child/ children. Ideas range from creating Martha Stewart type crafts, baking, making cards, and even hosting a little Valentine ’s Day get together party for other mummies and their children.

You often see mothers and daughters exchanging Valentine’s Day presents.  Groups of female friends often go out to celebrate Valentine’s Day. It can be a defiance of the day. A declaration of being secure and happy without a partner and love. If they are so secure in their context why are they making such a noisy and obvious show of themselves?

Altering Valentine’s Day to incorporate the celebration of platonic love is an abhorrence. It is technically incorrect and a far deviation from its courtly love origins. It’s an activity for  simple minded adults. It’s for adults with Readers Digest intellects.

The subtext behind this is pity. People pity each other for being single. They feel they have to provide a Valentine’s Day celebration to life their spirits.  A single person must be reminded that they are not forgotten.  The need to comfort the single and the elevated sadness that people feel from being single on Valentine’s Day is the real problem.

It reveals a susceptibility to commercialisation. It also reveals a simplistic mind who actually believes that being single on this day is a curse. A person who feels especially grieved from being single on Valentine’s Day needs their brain cell functions examined. Once again, a large susceptibility to commercialised events.

I once over heard an acquaintance saying that he had to call his mother and wish her a happy Valentine’s Day because she’s single. My initial thought was “why are you wishing your mother a happy Valentine’s day?” It didn’t make logical sense to me. It just seemed silly and basic minded.

Many years ago a former female  Facebook friend posted something that alarmed me. She was 30 years old at the time. She took a photo of her bed. It was  littered with flowers, chocolates, and stuffed toys. The caption read “Look what mummy gave me, Happy Valentine’s Day mum xxx”.  There was no Facebook evidence to suggest that the female was in a relationship. My initial thought was “are you in a incestuous relationship with your mother?”

Once I had moved on from that thought I realised that the mother pitied her single daughter and decided to shower her with gifts that a partner should be giving her. The daughter felt especially saddened and lonely to be single on Valentine’s Day. Once again, we have that susceptibility to consumerism and a a  simple minded thought process.

The need to celebrate  Valentine’s Day  is a commercialised curse. Furthermore, it exposes the moronic levels that are present in people who feel especially saddened to be single on Valentine’s Day. It includes people who change the concept of Valentine’s day in order to feel special and included.  That also includes enablers who feel that they need to give single people extra special attention on February 14th.

Leave a Reply


3 comments

  1. For me , Valentines day is just another day , Love should be shown to people you care about on a daily basis , not just one special day in the calendar ,. You can give roses etc any day of the year to loved ones ,. It’s mostly commercialism these days of course , another day to make money.
    Single people may feel unloved and relive painful memories of failed past relationships ., or loved ones that they have lost .
    If you want to show your love to special people in your life , demonstrate it daily , or any time you are around them .. . or whenever you feel the impulse to do so .

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