Here’s Why You Should Be Able To Reference Check Your Future Boss/Employer

reference checking a future boss
SHARE
Advertisement

Reference Checking A Future Boss: Finding a job really is a job in itself. This is why job seekers must make sure that they have a top notch resume when conducting their job search. A well written and well constructed resume capturing your career history will always aid in your employment search. A resume is not complete without at least three references. They confirm that you have worked for them and can confirm that you were a wonderful employee. It is not compulsory to put your references in your CV, you can supply them upon request.

employer reference check

The potential employee has to supply references in order for an organisation to run a back ground check on their qualifications and suitability for the role they are applying for. 

Should reference checking a future boss be common practise for prospective employees?  Reference checking a future boss allows for a similar back ground check.

It takes time and money to train a new employee so companies or employment agencies in the process of hiring want to make sure that they are getting the best possible person for the job. By conducting reference checks an organisation can find out whether a candidate has misrepresented themselves in order to get a job. Therefore it’s important for job recruiters to obtain references. Managers are preferential, but clients and even colleagues can make for acceptable references.

Generally employers and/or recruitment agencies look for the following while conducting a back ground check:

  • Verification of dates of employment.
  • Confirmation of job title and reporting level of job.
  • Verification of scope, duties and nature of job.
  • An evaluation of the applicant’s strengths and weaknesses.
  • Details of general job performance.
  • The applicant’s relations with colleagues, managers, and customers/clients.
  • Ask why the applicant left the position.
  • Ask whether the previous employer would be willing to re-employ them and why.

All of the above is more than fair. However, there seems to be a great amount of power tipped towards the employer’s favour. Yes, they are the ones who will be paying the employee’s salary so you may say the majority of the power should be tipped in the employer’s favour.

The job applicant doesn’t get to find out a great deal about what it is like working for the company. They can do some external research on what has been written about the place of business. a prospective employee may  know people or be connected to people who have worked in the company. This could lead to some very handy inside information. They can also ask certain questions during the interview process but they may avoid certain questions because they don’t want to come across as nosy, suspicious or provocative because they are trying to get a job.

The employer is also doing their best to sell themselves and their organisation in order to make it seem as attractive as possible to job seekers. It is an inevitable expectation that job seekers may lie, fabricate or distort truth during an interview process, so it’s perfectly logical to assume that an employer may do the same, they may misrepresent or conceal factors about the job, the company and management in order to make the position seem desirable.

As soon as an employer is ready to collect and contact references (generally during second or third round interviews) a prospective employee should have the right to ask for at least three references from the employer to determine whether the company meets their employment needs. The references should be of past employees who had the specific role that is on the market, or past employees who have worked in the same department. Would current employees be an acceptable form of reference? Possibly. But you also run the risk of employers picking certain employees and ensuring they provide the information that they want them to pass on.

The following pointers should be considered when the job applicant is reference checking a future boss

  • How long did you work for this organisation?
  • What was your job title?
  • Duties within the role?
  • Salary throughout your position?
  • Strengths and weaknesses of the organisation?
  • What were the strengths and weaknesses of the specific department you worked in?
  • Were  the managers good to work with?
  • What were the colleagues and clients/customers like?
  • Did you enjoy the workplace culture?
  • Why did you leave your position?
  • Would you ever work for this company again?

Leave a Reply


1 comments

More Articles
Close
Australians apologize too much

Australians Apologize Too Much: Unnecessary “Sorry” Overload! Here’s Why!

Have you ever noticed that Australians apologize too much? Often the “sorry” is not even necessary? If so, what is the cause? Do people in...
chrome    To make Old Simo your homepage in Chrome:
  1. Click the settings icon icon-setting at the top right of your browser. Select “Settings”.
  2. Under “On startup”, select “Open a specific page or set of pages”. Click “Set pages”, enter oldsimo.com, and click “OK”.
  3. Under “Appearance”, check “Show home button”. Click “Change”, enter oldsimo.com and click “OK”.
×
firefox    To make Old Simo your homepage in Firefox:
  1. Click the settings icon icon-setting at the top right of your browser. Select “Options.”
  2. Click on “General” and look for the “Home Page” line in the top block.
  3. Highlight the web address with your cursor. Click “Backspace” to delete the current homepage.
  4. Type oldsimo.com and Click “OK” to save the change.
×
safari    To make Old Simo your homepage in Safari:
  1. Click the settings icon at the top right of your browser. Select “Preferences.”
  2. Click on “General” and look for the “Home Page.”
  3. Highlight the web address with your cursor. Click “Backspace” to delete the current homepage.
  4. Type oldsimo.com and Click “Set to Current Page.”
  5. Click the Close button to exit the Preferences dialog.
×
General Questions and Feedback

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

General Questions and Feedback

×
Specific Questions for Old Simo

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Specific Questions for Old Simo

×
Submit an idea for Discussion

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Submit an idea for Discussion

×
Report a Technical Problem

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Report a Technical Problem

×
Report a Correction to Content

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Report a Correction to Content

×
Media and Advertising Enquiries

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Media and Advertising Enquiries

×